A Treatment Regimen for Tonsillitis and Tonsil Stones

Tonsillitis, an inflammation of the tonsils due to infection, affects over a million children and adults each year. The vast majority of cases occur in children between the ages of 5 and 15 Tonsillensteine. Tonsillitis is a contagious disease that is spread in the same manner as a cold or flu – by coming into contact with a contaminated surface area or an infected person’s germs via a sneeze or cough.

The tonsils, along with the adenoids, are part of the lymphatic system and together these glands protect us from inhaled and ingested contaminants. Sometimes, however, the glands themselves become infected by viruses or bacteria.

Symptoms of Tonsillitis

Tonsillitis can cause many of the same or similar symptoms as other ear, nose, and throat conditions (e.g. – strep throat, ear infections, the common cold, etc.). These symptoms include, but are not limited to:

  • Pain or difficulty swallowing
  • Swelling of the tonsils or lymph nodes
  • Sudden, unexplainable ear pain
  • A sore throat with a fever of 101 or higher
  • Unexplained bouts of coughing

The vast majority of tonsillitis symptoms merely cause discomfort and the condition itself is rarely serious. Complications of bacterial tonsillitis (tonsillitis caused by bacteria) can, in some cases, give rise to more serious threats such as peritonsillar abscess, glomerulonephritis, or rheumatic fever, to name a few.

Treatment of Tonsillitis

Treatment of tonsillitis depends largely on such factors as the age of the individual with the disease, the severity of the condition, and the cause – whether bacterial or viral. There is no one standard treatment for tonsillitis. Many of the measures taken during treatment will be aimed at alleviating the symptoms of discomfort – sore throat, headache, fever, ear pain, etc.